As borders open and travelling is more accessible, it is important to note the requirements and plan ahead before leaving the country. Like many countries since the pandemic, the first thing you’ll need before travelling to Bali is proof of at least 2 Covid-19 vaccinations.1 In fact, the requirements at the time of writing this article extend to proof of medical insurance that covers Covid-19 and medical evacuation to a referral hospital in Indonesia.1 Comprehensive travel insurance is probably a good idea too.1

But before we move on from vaccinations, you should probably seek the advice of a doctor or health professional familiar with the risks of travel to Bali. For example, Hepatitis A is a viral illness spread through contaminated food or water, and a vaccination against this is highly recommended when travelling to Bali.2 Hepatitis B may also be a risk, so if you haven’t received a protective vaccine in the past, consider that now. Typhoid may also be a risk if eating street food. You should seek travel vaccine advice at least 6-8 weeks before heading off.2

Now onto the more pleasurable part of the journey.

  • Bali is hot and humid, so light coloured and breathable fabric clothes are recommended. Shorts and t-shirts tend to be the Bali ‘uniform’, but if you’re planning to visit sacred places, you may need to cover up more. Fine dining restaurants may also enforce dress codes.
  • Sunscreen/sunblock is also essential. And don’t forget about sunglasses
  • Mosquito repellent should also be on your list, not just to avoid the discomfort of bites, but to reduce the risk of common insect-borne disease1
  • Footwear should include thongs/flip flops or sandals, but there are great places to hike around Bali, so footwear appropriate for hiking might be a good idea – and don’t forget the socks
  • ToiletriesTwo hikers with backpacks and LifeStraw Water Bottles
  • Medicines/first aid kit with simple analgesics, Band Aids etc. Note: Not all medication available over the counter or by prescription in Australia is available in other countries. Some may even be considered illegal or a controlled substance, even if prescribed by an Australian doctor. Some drugs used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for example are illegal in Indonesia.1
  • Travel sickness and anti-diarrhoeal tablets – you’ve probably heard of Bali Belly
  • Travel documents including passports and proof of vaccine and medical insurance
  • Credit and/or Debit cards
  • Earplugs – for audio and travel use (flight earplugs can help suppress noise and reduce the risk of ear pain. Read more here.
  • Power adapters. Indonesia uses two round pronged plugs for electricity (230 Volts). You can pick these up at airports or the travel section of department stores
  • Finally, tap water outside of resorts/hotels is not considered safe.4 While bottled water is available everywhere, you might want to help reduce the use of plastic and invest in a LifeStraw water bottle/filter. If you head out hiking, you’ll really appreciate the benefits of the LifeStraw system. LifeStraw microfilters remove 99.999999% of bacteria (including E.coli, Salmonella), 99.999% of parasites (including Giardia and Cryptosporidium), 99.999% of microplastics, as well as dirt, sand and cloudiness. Those products in the range incorporating carbon filters will also remove chlorine, organic chemical matter and odours for improved taste.5 Certainly something to keep in your arsenal before heading off to Australia’s favourite overseas travel destination. Check out the range of LifeStraw water filter bottles and filters here.

Sources:

  1. https://www.smartraveller.gov.au/destinations/asia/indonesia?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIlJ_AttON-AIVPZpmAh38gQcCEAAYASAAEgIXpvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
  2. https://www.traveldoctor.com.au/destinations/bali
  3. https://bali.com/bali-travel-guide/practical-tips-must-know/what-to-bring-to-bali-packing-list/
  4. https://www.tripsavvy.com/bali-packing-list-1458595
  5. https://lifestraw.com/pages/how-our-products-work